Connect with us

Entertainment

Taliban say US waged “pointless war” when US troops begin withdrawing

US Marines in Marja, Afghanistan in February 2010 (AFP via Getty Images)

US Marines in Marja, Afghanistan in February 2010 (AFP via Getty Images)

The United States has officially begun withdrawing its remaining troops from Afghanistan as it ends America’s longest war.

Joe Biden has said he wants the remaining 3,500 US troops to leave the country on May 1, until September 11, the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, which accelerated the invasion of Afghanistan, was the deadline for all-time troops to leave. :

Before his election defeat, Donald Trump set May 1 as the date for the departure of all US troops.

On the eve of the withdrawal, Taliban spokesman Suahil ինըahin told the Associated Press: “We say to the outgoing Americans … you have waged a senseless war, you have paid for it, we have made great sacrifices for our liberation.”

He added. “If you open a new chapter to help the Afghans rebuild and rebuild the country, the Afghans will appreciate it.”

Announcing the recall on April 14, Mr Biden said it was time to end what he called “eternal war”.

He said he believes the US presence in Afghanistan should “focus on why we went first. “So that Afghanistan is not used as a base from which to attack our homeland again.”

“It simply came to our notice then. “We have achieved that goal,” he said from the White House Convention Hall, where former President George W. Bush Bush announces launch of Operation Enduring Freedom in 2001 On October 7.

He said. “I said we would follow Osama bin Laden to the gates of hell,” he said. “That’s what we did, we got it.”

But that was a decade ago, Biden said, “and we’ve been in Afghanistan for a decade now.”

Sunday marks the 10th anniversary of the assassination of bin Laden by US special forces following the discovery of a house in the Pakistani city of Abbottabad.

At the height of the conflict in Afghanistan, there were about 100,000 US troops in the country. Some 2,444 people have lost their lives, including tens of thousands of Taliban, al-Qaeda and Afghan government forces. America’s NATO allies lost 1,114 troops, and Britain lost 454 civilians.

Last year was the first year when no US or NATO troops were killed.

The Expenditure on War project estimates that 47,245 Afghan civilians were killed and millions displaced during the conflict.

Violence rose last year despite ongoing peace talks. It is estimated that the Taliban now control more than half of the country.

In a statement issued Saturday, Taliban spokesman Ab Abihullah Mujahid said the launch of the full withdrawal “paved the way for any response (by the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan) to the Mujahideen ‘s occupation forces.”

However, he said Taliban fighters would wait for the leadership’s decision before launching an attack, which would be based on “the country’s sovereignty, values ​​and high interests”.

The AP contributed to this report

read more

UK Covid-19 vaccines. Recent data:

Rudy Gi ulian’s ouster worries Trump allies over future

Biden faces a more dangerous phase in his first 100 days

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *